Fact: There Is Such A Thing As Seasonal Depression In The Summer

Fact: There Is Such A Thing As Seasonal Depression In The Summer

Summertime SAD, also called “seasonal depression” or simply “summer depression,” is a type of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) that occurs during the summer. It’s typically caused by changes in sunlight and social factors like overcrowding at popular destinations during the summertime. Symptoms of ‘summertime SAD’ include losing interest in hobbies and staying quiet around family and friends. Some people who have fall/winter SAD also tend to experience summertime SAD..

Sure, everyone experiences a little less sunlight in the winter. But that’s not the sole reason for seasonal depression.

Sure, everyone experiences a little less sunlight in the winter. But that’s not the sole reason for seasonal depression.

There are actually three main factors that cause SAD: temperature (the colder it is), lack of sunlight (the darker it gets), and lack of vitamin D (which your body produces when exposed to sunlight). When these three things are combined, it can lead to SAD.

SAD is not the same thing as clinical depression; rather, it’s a type of depression that happens during the winter months. It’s thought to be caused by changes in your brain chemistry due to reduced exposure to natural light during this time of year.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) typically has to do with a chemical imbalance in the brain that causes people to feel depressed.

So, what is seasonal affective disorder? It’s a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons. It occurs in the fall and winter months, which is why it’s often referred to as “winter depression.”

The exact cause of SAD isn’t known. However, researchers believe it may be linked to changes in your brain chemicals during those times of year. You might also have SAD if you experience symptoms such as:

  • low energy or fatigue
  • weight gain or loss that doesn’t match any other change in diet or activity levels
  • feelings of hopelessness or guilt

Depression symptoms are worse the further you are from the equator—meaning people who live in Alaska and Northern Canada will experience the worst effects of SAD.

SAD is caused by lack of sunlight, and the farther you are from the equator—meaning people who live in Alaska and Northern Canada will experience the worst effects of SAD.

In fact, depression symptoms are worse the further you are from the equator—meaning people who live in Alaska and Northern Canada will experience the worst effects of SAD.

Symptoms of ‘summertime SAD’ include losing interest in hobbies and staying quiet around family and friends.

Summertime SAD is very real, and it’s not uncommon for people to feel down during the summer months. If you’re experiencing symptoms like losing interest in hobbies or staying quiet around family and friends, it could be seasonal depression.

Other possible signs of this type of depression include anxiety and difficulty sleeping. If you recognize these symptoms in yourself or someone you know, there are many options available for treatment—including light therapy (exposure to artificial light), antidepressants (medications that treat the symptoms of depression), psychotherapy (talking about problems with a therapist) and lifestyle changes such as eating healthier foods and exercising more often

Some people who have fall/winter SAD also tend to experience summertime SAD.

Some people who have fall/winter SAD also tend to experience summertime SAD. This is more common than experiencing wintertime SAD, but it does happen. It’s important to know that this type of seasonal depression can be just as severe as the other two types at times and should not be overlooked.

Summertime SAD is also known as “seasonal affective disorder” (SAD). It’s a form of depression that occurs during the summer months and usually goes away when fall, winter or spring arrives.

It can also be caused by weather changes and social factors like overcrowding at popular destinations during the summertime.

If you’re feeling down, it can be helpful to know that the problem may be seasonal depression. It’s when the sun is shining and your friends are getting together for picnics at the park—but instead of doing those things with them, you’d rather stay inside and watch Netflix.

In addition to being caused by weather changes and social factors like overcrowding at popular destinations during the summertime, seasonal depression can also be triggered by other factors such as a lack of sunlight or too much exposure to artificial light.

Summertime SAD sufferers might also experience anxiety or difficulty sleeping.

Summertime SAD sufferers might also experience anxiety or difficulty sleeping. We know that seasonal changes in the amount of sunlight can cause a wide range of physical and mental health symptoms, but what we don’t always realize is how much those same changes affect our moods.

Summer-induced anxiety (SIA) is a type of generalized anxiety disorder that develops because of the lack of adequate sunlight exposure during the summer months. In fact, it may be just as common as winter-induced depression (WID). SIA is thought to affect about 20% of Americans who live at northern latitudes where there are long periods without sun exposure during the summer months. It often occurs after a winter spent indoors with limited exposure to natural light and can occur even if you have never experienced WID before or any kind of seasonal depression whatsoever!

Both forms of SAD can be treated with antidepressants, light therapy, and psychotherapy.

The treatments for SAD are similar to those for major depressive disorder (MDD), which is the more common form of depression.

They include antidepressants, psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Light therapy is often used for both types.

Seasonal depression can happen in all seasons, so it’s important to know how to spot the symptoms, no matter when they occur.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that appears at the same time every year. SAD can occur at any time of year, but it’s most common in the fall and winter months.

The symptoms of seasonal depression include:

  • Increased appetite for sweet foods
  • Weight gain or weight loss
  • Feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness; difficulty concentrating on tasks; changes in sleep patterns such as insomnia or oversleeping
  • Low self-esteem, irritability, and loneliness

Conclusion

Seasonal depression can be a serious condition, and it’s important to know how to spot the signs of summertime SAD in yourself or your loved ones. If you suspect that you might be experiencing this disorder, talk to your doctor about treatment options like light therapy or psychotherapy. A therapist from Revive Therapeutic Services can help you benefit from your treatment plan.

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